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© Lockheed Martin Business | September 28, 2018

Lockheed selects Harris to deliver F-35's next-gen processor

Lockheed Martin has selected Harris Corporation to develop and deliver the next generation Integrated Core Processor (ICP) for the F-35 fighter jet.
The Lockheed Martin-led competition within the F-35 supply chain will significantly reduce cost and enhance capability.

The F-35's ICP acts as the brains of the F-35, processing data for the aircraft's communications, sensors, electronic warfare, guidance and control, cockpit and helmet displays.

"We are aggressively pursuing cost reduction across the F-35 enterprise and, after conducting a thorough review and robust competition, we're confident the next generation Integrated Core Processor will reduce costs and deliver transformational capabilities for the warfighter," says Greg Ulmer, Lockheed Martin vice president and general manager of the F-35 program, in a press release. "The next generation Integrated Core Processor for the F-35 will have positive benefits for all customers in terms of life cycle cost, capability, reliability and more."

The new Integrated Core Processor is a key element of the planned "Technology Refresh 3" modernisation. Additional elements in the tech refresh include the Panoramic Cockpit Display Electronic Unit and Aircraft Memory System, which were also recompeted and awarded to Harris last year.

The Harris-built ICP will be integrated into F-35 aircraft starting with Lot 15 aircraft, expected to begin deliveries in 2023.

An Open System Architecture to enable the flexibility to add, upgrade and update future capabilities
"The new F-35 ICP will pave the way for system scalability well into the future," says Ed Zoiss, president, Harris Electronic Systems. "Open systems are the future of avionics and Harris has invested substantial R&D to deliver more affordable and higher performance solutions than would have been possible using proprietary technology."

The ICP selection comes on the heels of Lockheed Martin's selection of Raytheon for the Next Gen Distributed Aperture System, which will reduce lifecycle costs by more than USD 3 billion, enhance reliability and increased capability. The next generation ICP system is targeted to generate a 75 percent reduction in unit cost.

"With production ramping up and the operational fleet growing fast, we are looking at every layer of our global supply chain to find opportunities to increase capacity, reduce production and sustainment costs, improve parts reliability and enhance capabilities," said Ulmer.

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October 15 2018 11:56 pm V11.6.0-2