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© rawpixelimages dreamstime.com Business | November 24, 2015

Samsung to provide Audi with memory chips

Samsung Electronics is participating in the Audi Progressive SemiConductor Program (PSCP) as the first semiconductor memory supplier.
The Audi Progressive SemiConductor Program is designed to make the latest semiconductor technologies available in cars, while increasing reliability, with the aim of intensifying the role and engagement of semiconductor companies in the process. Based on the strategic partnership, Samsung will provide its latest memory products including 20-nanometer LPDDR4 DRAM and 10-nanometer class eMMC (embedded multimedia card) 5.1 to Audi’s future infotainment, dashboard and ADAS (Advanced Driver Assistance Systems) automotive applications.

“It is an exciting moment to offer our industry leading memory solutions to embrace the rapidly growing automotive industry,” said Dr. Kinam Kim, president of Semiconductor Business at Samsung Electronics’ Device Solutions Division. “Based on this partnership, Samsung will bring various benefits and advanced user experience to the global automotive market while providing high quality memory products with excellent performance and enhanced reliability.”

“Samsung is leading memory technology development with its high-performance, high-density DRAM and NAND flash memory solutions based on the industry’s most advanced process technology”, said Ricky Hudi, Executive Vice President Electronic Development at Audi. “Through the PSCP strategic partnership with Samsung, Audi will utilize Samsung’s high speed memory products to provide the best user experience to our customers. Both parties are committed to achieving the quality levels that people expect from the Audi brand”.

According to a recent report by Gartner, the global automotive semiconductor market is expected to grow from USD 31.2 billion in revenue to USD 32.7 billion in 2016 approximately, while the automotive memory market portion will reach a 4.6% percent share or about USD 1.5 billion in 2016.
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